Getting the Creative Juices Flowing

 

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One shelf of books at the tying desk.

The winter months are prime time for hitting the vice and filling the fly boxes for the coming season.

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The Command Post – a quasi-organized area where things get done.

While we live in an area where it’s possible to fish year-round, many people don’t. Even with the possibility of fishing, the winter months are a prime time for us to start working on refilling our fly boxes for the coming season and experiment with some new patterns.

Books are a great resource for fly tying and getting some ideas flowing. One of the more thorough ones is Dave Hughes’ Trout Flies: The Tier’s Reference – step-by-step instructions for tying all kinds of fly patterns (nymphs, midges, some streamers, mayflies, caddisflies, attractors, terrestrials – the whole gamut). It’s one that gets pulled off the shelf a few times during the winter, sometimes just to leaf through and other times to use as a reference while experimenting with a pattern.

There is a wealth of information available on the internet as well from a variety of tiers. Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions has some of the most helpful step-by-step videos out there, where there are explanations given for why things are being tied a certain way. Brian Wise (Fly Fishing the Ozarks) also has some good videos focused mostly on tying streamers, and Gunnar Brammer (Brammer’s Custom Flies) also has informative step-by-step videos of some of his patterns. (Brammer’s two-part video on articulating flies is very informative!) A few other really helpful online video resources are Fly Fish FoodIn the Riffle, Schultz Outfitters, and Blue Ribbon Flies.

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A smaller variation of Steve Martinez’s Frankenstein Sculpin – follow the link for step-by-step pictures of the original.

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Part of the Nymph Box, in need of some refilling.

One of the most helpful things when tying flies (whether it’s experimenting with a few or getting ready to tie a dozen or more) is to have an organized tying area. If you’re in need of some suggestions on how to best organize your things, here are a few other helpful articles on prepping your tying station for a session:

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Prepped and ready.

It’s always fun to tie with others (even if it might not be the most productive). Call some friends, get some drinks and snacks and have a tying night together: share some ideas, and never be afraid to learn some new things. Things learned among friends sometimes stick more than watching a computer screen.
 
Whatever you do for tying this winter, always be willing to experiment with a new pattern or technique and never stop learning.
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One thought on “Getting the Creative Juices Flowing

  1. Pingback: Things Worth Reading: 2/17/2017 | Oak Hall Outfitters

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